17th Century: Drawstring Bag, 1610-1650

Drawstring bag

English, 1610–50

Item info from: https://collections.mfa.org/objects/119711

DESCRIPTION: Red silk satin embroidered with gold metallic threads, seed pearls, metal purl, spangles, and bits of colored glass. Baroque design. Embroidery stitches include laid and couching, beading, bullion knots, braid stitch. Green and metallic braided cords and strap at top; two wood-core drawstring pull tassels covered in seed pearls, with silk, metallic thread and spangles. Green silk lining.
PROVENANCEEx-Seligman Coll. (London); Elizabeth Day McCormick collection; Gift to the MFA, October 14, 1943
DIMENSIONS: Overall (without tassels and cord): 6 x 6 cm (2 3/8 x 2 3/8 in.)
CREDIT LINE: The Elizabeth Day McCormick Collection
ACCESSION NUMBER: 4:3.1080
CLASSIFICATIONS: Costumes

17th Century: Portrait of a young woman from a Gdańsk patrician family, around 1625-35

Portrait of a young woman from a Gdańsk patrician family, around 1625-35.
Artist unknown.
From the collection of Museu Sa Bassa Blanc.

17th Century: Spangled ruff in Portraits of Doña Ana de Velasco y Girón

She must have loved this amazing ruff with dangling silver pointed spangles, this looks like the same one and same person over a few decades! Must have ben her signature item.

 

17th Century: Portrait of Krystyna Lubomirska, after 1603

(Polish) National Musuem in Warsaw

More:

 

 

17th Century: Portrait of a lady with an elaborate jewelled headdress

Spanish School, 17th Century
Portrait of a lady with an elaborate jewelled headdress
oil on canvas
28 x 22 in. (71.1 x 55.9 cm.)

16th Century: Ventian purse


Translation via Google Translate:

Purse

Venice, end of the 16th century.
13x8x6 cm.

Cut velvet dark green silk embroidered in silver-gilt and silver yarn and curly, pearls, the application technique, the technique of blue silk satin stitch, silver sequins. Suspension and borders in gilt silver cord twisted yarn. Pink taffeta lining. The bag, unusual shape, could fulfill most uses: purses, comosuggests chuisa front pocket with a cord, door dust orportaprofumi. Wisely suspended the waist of the dress, very much in vogue, the ‘bag-shaped lute “and very valuable both for the quality of the embroidery and the richness of the materials for setting stistica.The plant motifs that adorn every part of the accessory are made with grace and richness of details highlighted by the many pearls placed in various parts in order to highlight the preziosita. This refined accessory, which certainly emphasized the sumptuousness of a ceremonial dress, it was probably a gift love, how can suggest two hearts pierced by two arrows, according to a custom widespread in the Renaissance.

The original description, in Italian:

BORSA

Venezia, fine del XVI secolo.
Cm. 13x8x6

Velluto tagliato di seta verde scuro ricamato in argento dorato e argento filato e riccio, perle, nella tecnica di applicazione; seta azzurra nella tecnica del punto raso; pailettes d’argento. Sospensione e bordure in cordoncino intrecciato d’argento dorato filato. Fodera in taffetas rosa acceso. La borsa, forma insolita, poteva assolvere a piu usi: portamonete, como suggerisce la tasca anteriore chuisa da un cordoncino, porta polveri o portaprofumi. Sapientemente sospesa alla cintura dell’abito, come imponeva la moda, la “borsetta a forma di liuto” e alquanto preziosa sia per la qualita del ricamo e la richezza dei materiali che per l’impostazione stistica. I motivi fitomorfi che ornano ogni parte dell’accessorio sono stati realizzati con grazia e ricchezza di particolari evidenziati dalle numerose perle collocate in varie parti per sottolinearne la preziosita.Questo raffinatissimo accessorio, che certo ribadiva la sontuosita di un abito cerimoniale, probabilmente era un dono d’amore, come possono suggerire i due cuori trafitti da due frecce, secondo un’usanza molto diffusa nell’epoca rinascimentale.

© I Mestieri della moda a Venezia dal XIII al XVIII Secolo. Ala Napoleonica E Museo Correr, Venice. 1988.

 

17th Century: purple velvet pouch

Purse of purple velvet, consisting of four pattes on which alternately the crowned monogram ‘DG’ or ‘ML’ or two entwined hands under a burning heart, embroidered with multicolored silk, gold thread, pearls, spangles and rubies, anonymous, c. 1600 – c. 1625

17th Century: 1628 Beaded Bag

A number of beaded bags from the early 17th century survive. Their stylized floral patterns and less expensive materials imitate the elaborate embroidered versions carried by the aristocracy. Many bear mottos or expressions relating to charity, friendship or luck, which suggests that they may have been used for gifts of money.
Link to page @ V&A

Materials & Making
The development of the ‘drawn-glass’ technique about 1490 allowed the manufacture of large numbers of small, round, coloured beads with a central hole, of the type used in this purse. The glassworks on the island of Murano near Venice were the most famous during the Renaissance, but by the early 17th century the technology had spread to glass-making centres in Amsterdam and Bavaria. Beads were produced mainly for trade with North America and Africa, but they were also sold in Europe for use in embroidery.

Subjects Depicted
The expression ‘hit or miss’ is first recorded in the English language in William Shakespeare’s play Troilus and Cressida published in 1606, where it has the same meaning of random luck that it has today. The expression may have derived from a country dance also known as ‘hit and miss’, recorded as early as 1626.

Purse of brown glass beads on a ground of netted silk. With a diamond diaper pattern in blue and white beads with clusters of green and blue beads at the intersections. In each diamond a letter ‘S’ in dark blue beads is surrounded by white and yellow beads. Lined with leather and buff silk. Two tassels of buff silk ribbon at the bottom.

  • Height: 8.9cm
  • Width: 12.7cm
  • Depth: 1cm

Outside link: Veil and Edge Beading

I used to have a PDF for a class on some basic veil edging work and a little research. It was corrupted over the years and  recently was asked to try to find it and was unable to.

But I did find THIS. And it’s far superior to what I had, and why re-invent the wheel when I can spread the love. So it’s linked below!

Point any Questions about it to the author, Dona Yasmina who has contact info on the last page of the document.

Practically Period and Perfectly Practical Prettification: Basic Steps in Beaded Edging
by Dona Alessandra Bentivegna da Faenza, called Yasmina, Barony of Thescorre

16th Century: Portrait of Hedwig Jagiello

Hedwig Jagiello (1513-1573)

Hedwig Jagiello was born on March 15., 1513 in poznań and died on February 7., 1573 She was a polish princess from 1535 to 1535 until 1535

Hedwig was the daughter of the king of Poland. From Poland from his marriage to Barbara references, daughter of hungarian pala and magnet Stephan references.

She married on 1. September 1535 in krakow on 1. September 1535 in Krakow. Four children were born four children:

• Elisabeth (born). 1537; gesture. He married Duke Franz Otto, married to Duke Franz Otto of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Born 1595). 1530; gesture. 1559
• Sigismund (born). 1538; gesture. 1566), Prince of Brandenburg, Archbishop of magdeburg and bishop of Berlin
• Hedwig (born). 1540; gesture. 1602), princess of Brandenburg, married to Duke Julius of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel
• Sophia (born). 1541; gesture. 1564), princess of Brandenburg, married to Wilhelm Von Rosenberg

The Strictly Catholic Princess held on her faith, even when her husband turned to Lutheran teaching and began the reformation in Brandenburg. Joachim had released his wife to accept the new marriage or to remain faithful to the old man.

She accompanied her husband in 1541 to regensburg in 1541 When Joachim accepted Luther’s teaching, she remained with her catholic faith in her Catholic Faith, which gave her the spouse after interventions from Krakow.

After the death of Joachim II. In 1571 she lived at the castle of ruppin castle in old ruppin. She died there at the age of 59 on February 7., 1573.

.
Source:
Www. Gene. Org
Www. Berlin-the capital. They
Www. DB-Thueringen. They
(Digital Library Thuringia)
Www Yes Wow! PL
(German Historical Institute Warsaw)
Www. Universes-Mercatores-of-Hansa-Theutonicorum. From
(Universitatis Jagellonica Cracoviensis acta scientiarum)

Literature:
– Johann Dorner: Duchess Hedwig and her court state: everyday life at the castle castle according to original sources of the 15. th century, volume 53 of Burgundy’s history leaves
– Juliane Jacobi: Pre-Modern Education: Self-and foreign descriptions in the early modern period (contributions to historical education research, volume 41), page 216, ISBN 10: 9783412204921 AND ISBN 13: 978-3412204921

Image: Hedwig Princess of brandenburg at 1535, portrayed by Hans Krell (1490-1565)

16th Century: Beaded Bag

Beaded leather bag, 1630s, British; inscribed ‘heare et is hit or miss’, acorn pattern

 

A number of beaded bags from the early 17th century survive. Their stylized floral patterns and less expensive materials imitate the elaborate embroidered versions carried by the aristocracy. Many bear mottos or expressions relating to charity, friendship or luck, which suggests that they may have been used for gifts of money. This example is inscribed ‘heare et is hit or miss’.

The development of the ‘drawn-glass’ technique about 1490 allowed the manufacture of large numbers of small, round, coloured beads with a central hole, of the type used in this purse. The glassworks on the island of Murano near Venice were the most famous during the Renaissance, but by the early 17th century the technology had spread to glass-making centres in Amsterdam and Bavaria. Beads were produced mainly for trade with North America and Africa, but they were also sold in Europe for use in embroidery.

The expression ‘hit or miss’ is first recorded in the English language in William Shakespeare’s play Troilus and Cressida published in 1606, where it has the same meaning of random luck that it has today. The expression may have derived from a country dance also known as ‘hit and miss’, recorded as early as 1626.

Text from: https://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O74982/purse-unknown/http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O158778/bag-unknown/

Physical description: A flat, square leather bag, covered with red, white, green, yellow and blue glass beads in a repeating pattern of stylized acorns. It has silver thread loops, silk tassels and holes in the leather for a drawstring

Place of Origin: Great Britain (made)

Date: 1630-1639 (made)

Materials and Techniques: Kidskin, glass beads, linen thread, silk thread, silver thread; hand sewn, hand beaded

Dimensions: Length: 13.0 cm approx., bag only, Width: 14.6 cm approx., bag only

Beaded leather bag, 1630s, British; inscribed ‘heare et is hit or miss’, acorn pattern

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no): John Lea Nevinson, Catalogue of English Domestic Embroidery of the Sixteenth & Seventeenth Centuries, Victoria and Albert Museum, Department of Textiles, London: HMSO, 1938, p.100

Materials: Kidskin; Glass beads; Linen thread; Silk thread; Silver thread

17th Century: Flinderhaube

This is from a SCA researcher, who did a rather spectacular bit of research into those amazing gold German cauls you see often. Sometimes they look like beads, but sometimes they don’t, and here is a bit of info on what they are!

I will just send you there since it’s not entirely beads, even though a decorative thing with a hole technically qualifies, but it is late to post period so – off you go!

Flinderhaube – project documentation

17th Century: Ironing Crown

Ironing crown (belongs to the head reliquary of St. Walburga)

Location: Scheer, Catholic parish church of St. Nicholas & former collegiate church
Date:1601/1700

Item:Krone
Genus:Applied Arts

Material / Technique:enamel, pearl, gemstone

Link to this page:https://www.bildindex.de/document/obj20745011

Record of:Bildarchiv Foto Marburg