17th Century: Beadwoven Panel (1657)

Panel Made in 1657

In the collections at the V&A, London, not on display.

ARTIST/MAKER
Unknown
PLACE OF ORIGIN
England (made)

Coloured and transparent glass beads threaded together on silk

OBJECT DETAILS

CATEGORY
Textiles
OBJECT TYPE
Panel
MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES
glass beads threaded onto silk ground
Glass Beads
Silk
BRIEF DESCRIPTION
beaded, 1657, English; Coloured beads, floral decoration with inscription
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION
Coloured and transparent glass beads threaded together on silk
DIMENSIONS
  • Height: 16.5cm
  • Width: 31cm
  • Unmounted depth: 0.5cm
MARKS AND INSCRIPTIONS
Naturs flowers soon doe fade ful long we last cause art us made ARW 1657

17th Century: Drawstring Bag, 1610-1650

Drawstring bag

English, 1610–50

Item info from: https://collections.mfa.org/objects/119711

DESCRIPTION: Red silk satin embroidered with gold metallic threads, seed pearls, metal purl, spangles, and bits of colored glass. Baroque design. Embroidery stitches include laid and couching, beading, bullion knots, braid stitch. Green and metallic braided cords and strap at top; two wood-core drawstring pull tassels covered in seed pearls, with silk, metallic thread and spangles. Green silk lining.
PROVENANCEEx-Seligman Coll. (London); Elizabeth Day McCormick collection; Gift to the MFA, October 14, 1943
DIMENSIONS: Overall (without tassels and cord): 6 x 6 cm (2 3/8 x 2 3/8 in.)
CREDIT LINE: The Elizabeth Day McCormick Collection
ACCESSION NUMBER: 4:3.1080
CLASSIFICATIONS: Costumes

17th Century: Portrait of a young woman from a Gdańsk patrician family, around 1625-35

Portrait of a young woman from a Gdańsk patrician family, around 1625-35.
Artist unknown.
From the collection of Museu Sa Bassa Blanc.

17th Century: Spangled ruff in Portraits of Doña Ana de Velasco y Girón

She must have loved this amazing ruff with dangling silver pointed spangles, this looks like the same one and same person over a few decades! Must have ben her signature item.

 

17th Century: Portrait of Krystyna Lubomirska, after 1603

(Polish) National Musuem in Warsaw

More:

 

 

17th Century: Portrait of a lady with an elaborate jewelled headdress

Spanish School, 17th Century
Portrait of a lady with an elaborate jewelled headdress
oil on canvas
28 x 22 in. (71.1 x 55.9 cm.)

17th Century: Hungarian wedding dress

WOMAN’S CORSET-BODICE AND SKIRT
Mid-17th Century
MAGYAR NEMZETI MÚZEUM
(Hungarian National Museum)
Budapest, Hungary

Earlier researches attributed the costume to Pál Esterházy’s (1635–1713) first wife Orsolya Esterházy (1641–1682) and later to his second wife Éva Thököly (1659–1716). The original owner can no longer be traced but the cut and the embroidery ascertain that either could have worn it at her wedding. Contrary to Western European customs, in Hungary later generations gladly donned the ornate costumes of their forebears on some festive occasion. The suite was restored by Mrs Sándor Borsi between 1969 and 1971.

The skirt and the attached bodice constitute an outstanding ensemble of old Hungarian costume, a harmonious alloy of the exotic oriental traditions of earlier centuries and elements of the fast-changing Western European fashions.

(Note from Jen: I’m going to guess the red beads are Coral, I have many such examples of coral beads from Germany in earlier centuries. I’m trying to find more on this.)

17th Century: purple velvet pouch

Purse of purple velvet, consisting of four pattes on which alternately the crowned monogram ‘DG’ or ‘ML’ or two entwined hands under a burning heart, embroidered with multicolored silk, gold thread, pearls, spangles and rubies, anonymous, c. 1600 – c. 1625

17th Century: Game Bag

Embroidered game bag: silk, silver, and gold on velvet (Dresden 1609)

17th Century: 1625-1650 Beaded bag

Small flat bag of coloured beads netted on a foundation of thick linen thread, and patterned with bird and flowers and inscribed ‘IN HOP ME HART DOTH REST’. With brown, green, white, yellow and blue beads. Lined with chamois leather. Above the beadwork is a band of material of green silk covered with a pale pink silk.

Link to item @ V&A

There is also a pink satin lining and pink ribbon handles. The pink silk and satin are probably later additions.

‘IN HOP ME HART DOTH REST’ (Inscribed in beadwork above the birds and flowers)

  • Width: 13cm
  • Length: 11.5cm
  • Width: 5.125in
  • Length: 4.5in

 

17th Century: 1662 Mirror

Looking glass or mirror, seven inches wide, in a wide frame with beadwork decoration arranged in two full-height verticals and two short horizontal panels

top and bottom. Yellow cord runs between the vertical and horizontal panels.

Design

In each corner a medallion containing a figure of a woman, one of them being Diana with a bow and dog, the others represented with a horse, an alligator, and a cock. In the upper rectangle are three seated women (possibly the three Fates spinning) with a naked recumbent man below. To the left is Venus with Cupid and a peacock and, above, her chariot drawn by a pair of doves. To the right is a clothed woman, possibly Charity, with three naked children. Below is a composition of flowers, birds and beasts. Along the upper edge the inscription: ‘IM6 6W2’. The sight and back edges of the frame are lined with tooled brown leather, worked in a geometric pattern.

2018 – in a modern glazed case

  • Height: 71.1cm
  • Width: 66cm (Note: Thickness of frame estimated at 4cm.)

H 2′ 4″ W 2′ 2″ 2018 In a modern glazed case 75 x 70 x 6.5cm
Link to V&A page

17th Century: 1659 Basket

Examples of beadwork that can be associated with makers whose names and dates are known suggest that they were usually made by teenage girls from affluent families. Their function is uncertain. They may have been used as layette baskets, which held baby clothes, because they are similar in form to silver examples. But it has also been suggested that they were made to celebrate betrothals or used at wedding ceremonies to hold gloves, sprigs of rosemary or other favours given to guests. Most examples depict a couple as the central motif. All of the design elements may be found in silk embroidery on domestic furnishings of the period.
Link to item @ V&A

Materials & Making
The basket is made from glass beads strung on linen thread and fine wire, supported on a wire frame lined with silk. Beadwork keeps true, clear colours, an advantage over coloured silks and wools, the usual materials for embroidery. A beaded cushion in the V&A dated 1657 bears the inscription ‘natvrs flowers soon doe fade ful long we last cavse art vs made’.

Ownership & Use
Another beaded basket of identical design exists, with only the name and date different. This suggests that it may have been worked from a type of kit, or possibly made to commission as a gift, with the recipient’s name added.

1659, English; Signed Sarah Gurnall
set with the maker or recipient’s name : sarah gvrnall avgvst 24 anno 1659

  • Height: 11cm
  • Width: 46.5cm
  • Depth: 36cm

17th Century: 1628 Beaded Bag

A number of beaded bags from the early 17th century survive. Their stylized floral patterns and less expensive materials imitate the elaborate embroidered versions carried by the aristocracy. Many bear mottos or expressions relating to charity, friendship or luck, which suggests that they may have been used for gifts of money.
Link to page @ V&A

Materials & Making
The development of the ‘drawn-glass’ technique about 1490 allowed the manufacture of large numbers of small, round, coloured beads with a central hole, of the type used in this purse. The glassworks on the island of Murano near Venice were the most famous during the Renaissance, but by the early 17th century the technology had spread to glass-making centres in Amsterdam and Bavaria. Beads were produced mainly for trade with North America and Africa, but they were also sold in Europe for use in embroidery.

Subjects Depicted
The expression ‘hit or miss’ is first recorded in the English language in William Shakespeare’s play Troilus and Cressida published in 1606, where it has the same meaning of random luck that it has today. The expression may have derived from a country dance also known as ‘hit and miss’, recorded as early as 1626.

Purse of brown glass beads on a ground of netted silk. With a diamond diaper pattern in blue and white beads with clusters of green and blue beads at the intersections. In each diamond a letter ‘S’ in dark blue beads is surrounded by white and yellow beads. Lined with leather and buff silk. Two tassels of buff silk ribbon at the bottom.

  • Height: 8.9cm
  • Width: 12.7cm
  • Depth: 1cm

17th Century: Beaded Casket

Casket

English ca. 1650-1660 (made)

Wooden casket decorated with panels of glass beads sewn onto a canvas ground. On the lid is a figure of Justice depicted with her attributes of sword and scales. On the sides are cupid and a seated lady, on the back a mermaid and swan. The casket has metal handles at the sides and a key in the centre front. There is a shallow drawer at the bottom of the front side. No other internal fittings remain.
  • Width: 270mm
  • Height: 155mm
  • Depth: 290mm

Link to Object @ the V&A

16th: Drawstring Bag

Pictures & info from: https://www.mfa.org/collections/object/drawstring-bag-119706

Drawstring bag
English
late 16th–early 17th century

Overall (without tassels and cord): 13.3 x 13 cm (5 1/4 x 5 1/8 in.

Silk satin emroidered with silk, gold metallic threads, metal purl, and seed pearls Braided silk and metallic cords and tassels

Small square drawstring bag. White silk satin embroidered with polychrome silk, gold metallic threads, metal purl, and seed pearls. Design of flower flanked by birds and cornicopias; floral motifs fill out ground. Stitches include laid and couching, scroll couching, satin stitch, raised work, and knots.

Salmon/white/metallic cords with two silk and metallic covered-wood tassels; three similar tassels at base. Pink silk lining. White satin is fraying at top and bottom to reveal vertical pink and green wefts.

17th Century: Flinderhaube

This is from a SCA researcher, who did a rather spectacular bit of research into those amazing gold German cauls you see often. Sometimes they look like beads, but sometimes they don’t, and here is a bit of info on what they are!

I will just send you there since it’s not entirely beads, even though a decorative thing with a hole technically qualifies, but it is late to post period so – off you go!

Flinderhaube – project documentation

17th Century: Ironing Crown

Ironing crown (belongs to the head reliquary of St. Walburga)

Location: Scheer, Catholic parish church of St. Nicholas & former collegiate church
Date:1601/1700

Item:Krone
Genus:Applied Arts

Material / Technique:enamel, pearl, gemstone

Link to this page:https://www.bildindex.de/document/obj20745011

Record of:Bildarchiv Foto Marburg

17th Century: Cockatrice Jewelry box

This jewellery case is decorated with beadwork, a popular embroidery technique in the 17th century, in which tiny glass beads were threaded in sequence and sewn into place. The padded central panel lifts open to show a compartment for jewellery, lined with pink taffeta. The quality of glass beads and other material, and the involvement of a cabinet-maker in making the beadwork up into such a box, would mean that it could only be made within a household which could afford such outlay. Being such an intricate and relatively precious thing, the case’s owners (Martha and her successors) would have handled it very gently; thus it remains in good condition today.

People
Martha Edlin (1660-1725) worked a series of embroideries during her childhood, including this jewellery case, which were cherished by her descendants and passed down through the female line in her family for over 300 years. We know little about her life, except that she married a man called Richard Richmond and appears to have been a prosperous widow living in Pinner in Greater London at the time she drew up her will, with daughters and grandchildren.

Materials & Making
Following the usual development of needlework skills in a young educated girl in the mid-17th century, Martha Edlin embroidered a sampler in coloured silks at the age of eight, and a more complicated piece in whitework and cutwork at nine. By 1671, her eleventh year, she had embroidered the panels of an elaborate casket, and two years later this beadwork jewellery case. The needlework skills she demonstrated in these pieces would be important attributes in her adulthood, in the management of her household and the making, mending and decoration of her own and her family’s clothes.

Wooden jewellery case covered with embroidered silk with coloured silks, metal purl and glass beads. Takes the form of a recessed compartment with a padded hinged lid with a tiny lifting ring, and a wide flat surrounding frame, and it stands on four feet. The inside of the case is lined with pink silk and fitted out with slots for jewellery along one side. The outside top surface is covered with white silk satin embroidered with coloured silks and glass beads.

On the lid, surrounded by an oval wreath formed by silk-wrapped leaves of parchment, is a cockatrice in a tree, with flowers around, and worked in glass beads. Outside the wreath are flowers and a leopard worked in silks in tent and rococo stitches, with the name ‘Martha Edlin’ above and the date ‘1673’ below. On the frame surrounding the lid are birds and flowering plants worked in beads.

The corners of the frame rest on four round wooden feet. The underside is lined with marbled paper. The edges and seams are covered with silver braid.

  • Height: 8.9cm
  • Width: 36.8cm
  • Depth: 31.8cm
Honestly there is so much info about this piece on that link it would be silly to NOT send you there.
Shire Album # 57 “Beadwork” Pamela Claburn Says:
A cockatrice within a wreath, flowers, and the inscription “Martha Edlin” Dated 1673. Satin embrodered with silk, glass beads and stiffened ribbon; tent and roccoco stitches and couch work. Detail: 12″x14″ (30.5×35.5 cm), Detail of the lid of a embroidered jewel case.”
Source for some pictures: The Victoria and Albert’s Textile Collection: Emroidery in Britain from 1200 to 1750 Donald King and Santina Levey Canopy Books, 1993, A division of Abbeyville Press, Inc. ISBN: 1-55859-652-6