17th Century: Beaded bellows

A pair of silver mounted bellows with working mechanism, decorated on both sides with small glass beads; on other side in a floral pattern and on the other with a central cartouche with a scene of a lack and gentleman in a landscape.

English, cira 1690)
Length: 22 in / 36 cm
Width: 10in/233 cm

From: The Needle’s Excellency and Other Textiles (Publisher: Mallett, London, 1997)

18th Cetury: Beaded panel

English, circa 1700. Framed: 39 x 45cm

From: The Needle’s Excellency and Other Textiles (Publisher: Mallett, London, 1997)

17th Century: beaded silk purse

Beads and pearls embroidered on silk, on both sides, 6×6 inches. English.

From: The Needle’s Excellency and Other Textiles (Publisher: Mallett, London, 1997)

13th Century: Ciborium/Ziborium (Host Box)

Beaded container for the Holy Host
Second half of the 13th Century, Schnutgen Museum, Köln (Cologne) Germany

In german: Ziborium mit perlstickerei, Niedersachen, 2, Halfte 13 JH

Wooden core, embroidery with glass beads, freshwater pearls, and metal bead appliqué on parchment. H. 29.5 cm, Dia. 10 cm (Inv. N 42)

This precious and extremely rare vessel of extraordinary artistic quality was created to store the consecrated host for the Eucharist. The utilisation of different materials in this ciborium, originally from Hildesheim Cathedral, is particularly exceptional. Parchment is wrapped over the wooden core in the shape of a chalice, which is closed with a lid, and the object is entirely adorned with freshwater pearls and glass beads as well as metal appliqués. Various scenes from the history of salvation are depicted against a blue background: the Annunciation, the Crucifixion with Mary and John, and the Coronation of the Virgin by Christ can be seen in medallions on the body of the ciborium. Symbols of the four evangelists adorn the lower part of the chalice and white lilies its base. Scenes from the Passion are embroidered on the cone-shaped lid: the Flagellation and the Carrying of the Cross. A gilded cross crowns the entire vessel.

Kleinschmidt and later von Bock mentioned the ciborium in connection with a portable altar from the church treasury of St. Paul’s Cathedral in Münster, whose side walls are adorned with technically as well as stylistically similar pearl embroidery. According to von Bock, “the style and technique of the embroidery [demonstrate] the earliest phase of glass beads embroidery, which before the 13th century does not evidence figural representation filling the entire space”. She dated the ciborium and the portable altar to the second half of the 13th century (von Bock, p. 288). Witte referred to an antependium from the church treasury of Halberstadt Cathedral with several medallions embroidered with true pearls, dated to 1200, together with the ciborium from the Museum Schnütgen, as persuasive examples of “evidence for the very invention of pearl embroidery” (Witte, p. 1). Von Euw likewise dated the liturgical vessel to the second half of the 13th century and located it in Lower Saxony (Hildesheim?).

Sporbeck followed this attribution both chronologically and geographically (Sporbeck, p. 18). Confirmation of this attribution is supplied by a container for the host, which has a similar blue background and is from Lower Saxony, from the church treasury of Halberstadt Cathedral, dated by Schorta to the second half of the 13th century (Meller/ Mundt/Schmuhl 2008, pp. 136-137, no. 37).

In 2011-2012 extensively cleaned and conserved in the Abegg-Stiftung, Riggisberg (CH).

Documented in the church treasury of Hildesheim Cathedral from the early 15th century; likely arrived after 1833 as part of the collection of the Hildesheim bishop Eduard Jakob Wedekin (1796-1870; see Roth); acquired in 1876 by Alexander Schnütgen from the collection in Hildesheim.

Cat. Kunsthistorische Ausstellung 1876, 58, no. 364 (A. Schnütgen) – Kleinschmidt 1903,332

– Witte 19116 – von Bock 1963, 287-288

– Cat. Schatzkammer 1991, 143-144, no. 42 (L. von Wilckens) – von Euw 1993b, 40-41 – Sporbeck 1996, 18-19

– Depierraz 2012, 10-11
– Roth 2018, 45-46, 61.

From: Museum Schnütgen in Cologne: A Survey of the Collection (2017) Edited by Moritz Woelk and Manuela Beer 

Some Color Pictures from “Stadt im Wandel: Kunst und Kultur des Bürgetums in Norddeutchland 1150-1650”

Some pictures from: https://www.bildindex.de/document/obj05071467?medium=rba_c005536
Some photos are copyright courtesy the most gracious Racaire at www.racaire.com

17th Century: Beadwoven Panel (1657)

Panel Made in 1657

In the collections at the V&A, London, not on display.

ARTIST/MAKER
Unknown
PLACE OF ORIGIN
England (made)

Coloured and transparent glass beads threaded together on silk

OBJECT DETAILS

CATEGORY
Textiles
OBJECT TYPE
Panel
MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES
glass beads threaded onto silk ground
Glass Beads
Silk
BRIEF DESCRIPTION
beaded, 1657, English; Coloured beads, floral decoration with inscription
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION
Coloured and transparent glass beads threaded together on silk
DIMENSIONS
  • Height: 16.5cm
  • Width: 31cm
  • Unmounted depth: 0.5cm
MARKS AND INSCRIPTIONS
Naturs flowers soon doe fade ful long we last cause art us made ARW 1657

14th Century: Cheb Antependium

 


Antipendium (altar hanging) of Cathderal/Chapel of Cheb*
Approx. 1300 AD.

Okay, I freely admit I’m extremely interested in this piece since it seems to have stayed in the very cathedral/town where it was made, and lived, and is still in such great shape. I have some research on Cheb and these locations mentioned in the plate descriptions, see it after the pictures below.

Four pictures from Jessica Grimm who has this blog entry, that you must really go to as she has done a great write up on it.

*also known as Eger (see note after plate description) Dimensions: 88cm x 228cm. Museum der stadt Cheb, Czechoslovakia.
SOURCE: “La Riqueza del Bordado Eclesiastico en Checoslovaquia”, by Zoroslava Drobna, 1949

Plate info in spanish:
Antipendium bordado con abalorios multicolores (perlitas de cristal) y con coralitos rosáceos. En dos filas, una encima de la otra, que constan de diez arcadas semicirculares, tiene colocadas las figuras de la Vírgen María, de Cristo, de santos y de santas. En su parte superior consta de una tira o franja, en la cual se hallan sobrepuestas o aplicadas cabezas, pintadas y más recientes, de santos y una tira con una inscripción mulitada por restauraciones posteriores. las figuras y las arcadas han sido borodadas sobre pergamino, borado que años más tarde ha aplicado o cosido sobre una tela de seda roja. Probablemente ha sido confeccionado por las monjas del convento de Santa Clara de Cheb para la cahilla del castillo de Cheb. Proximiades del año 1300 Dimensiones 88cmx228cm Museo Municipal de Cheb.

Plate info in English – to the best of my talents and using an online translator:
Altar hanging embroidered with multicolored glass beads (glass pearls?) and with rosaceous coralitos. In two rows, one upon the other of ten semicircular arches around the figures of the Virgin Maria, Christ, saints. In the top part it consists of a border which has overlapping or applied heads, painted and more recent, of saints and a strip with an inscription mutilated by later restorations. The figures and the arches have been embroidered on parchment, embroidered over years and applied or sewn on red silk fabric. Probably was made by the nuns of the convent of Saint Klara of Cheb for chapel of the castle of Cheb. Approx. 1300 AD. Dimensions 88cm x 228cm. City Museum of Cheb, (Czechoslovakia.)

 

RESEARCH ON THIS PIECE’S ORIGINS

Notes About Cheb, Czech Republic: during the Middle Ages, and even into fairly modern times, Cheb (which is directly on the modern German/Czech border) has changed hands to and from Germany many times. Map of modern Czech Bohemian Province: Cheb can be seen almost extreme right, junst under the little finger section that shoots into Germany, right along the border. Youc an see how this could have changed hands many times. (another map has Cheb clearly marked extreme west point of Czech.)As a result, Germany calls it Eger and Czechoslovakia calls is Cheb.

You will see this listed more often as being from “Eger (Cheb)” more than “Cheb” alone. To make this even more confusing – There is also a Eger, Hungary It’s made my researching this piece a bit difficult, added to that all, Czechoslovakia was called “Bohemia” in period. Here is a period map of Cheb when it was Eger, Germany – the chapel of St. Klara is clearly marked in the high res pic entitled “De germania, Egrana ciuitas, olimde imperio Romanorum hodie uero regno Bohemiae subiecta”That last link calls Cheb “Located on Ohre river near the German border; town fell to Bohemian king Otakar I in 13th cen.; was often damaged by war, including in Hussite wars (1419-1436), Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648) & War of Austrian Succession (1740-1748). ”

The Czech.cz history page, mentions German Colonization inthe 13th Century. Now, Locating the piece’s orgin in Cheb (Then named “Eger”):The plate description above says this was: “Probably was made by the nuns of the convent of Saint Klara of Cheb for chapel of the castle of Cheb.” Let’s break this down.

You can see some of these Cheb locations, as they stand now that are mentioned above, at Cheb’s Wepage and the above map link which I think shows them in period as well. So does this page.

The convent was founded as a Franciscan church, and functioned as such for a couple hundred years, but converted to a Minorite (“Minores”) order in the 1500’s – which is whwen this map was made. (go about half way across) *right* next to the what we conclude to be the very Convent of St Klara (“S:Klara”) Cheb’s page even notes the order change: “Franciscan church: The Minorite church was built simultaneously with a convent after 1247 when Franciscans settled in Cheb. A vestry and adjacent portion of walling has been preserved from the original building from the mid-13th Century. A cloister of the convent from the 1st half of the 14th Century is one of the most beautiful landmarks in the town’s historical center.” So we know it was there at the right time, and we know it’s still there. Now, If you look at the modern pic of the Minorite churchand the period map of Cheb when it was Eger, Germany, you can see a definite resemblance of the modern and to the towers of “S:Klara” and the adjacent”Minores” in the map, which would be the Minorite Church.

In the 15th Century a bunch of Franciscan monasteries converted sub order called Minorite, who I thinks were a little more conservative, even more than the “Poor Clare’s” who were founded by St Clare and who’s tenants included strict cloistering away from the world and devout poverty.

We know that the the Convent of St Klara was adjacendt to the “Minorite” church from the map. We’re at the very least in the right area of town, and it’s really cool to at least see in period where it came from, if it is from where they say.

John Moorman, MEDIEVAL FRANCISCAN HOUSES, St. Bonaventure (NY): The Franciscan Institute, 1983:[page 169:] FRANCISCAN FRIARY AT “EGER (Cheb): Franciscan Province of Saxony or Bohemia, Leipzig.”Before 1256 (AFH v, 362). In 1270 the town was burnt down, including the church of the friars. Four friars and ten others were burnt to death in the church (AF ii, 83). It became Observant in due course, but the date of this is uncertain. Some say 1463 (“Beiträge Sächs. 1907, 9); others give 1465 (AFH v, 362) or 1472 (FS i, 239).”[page 582] POOR CLARES at Eger “Founded c. 1270 being built next to the friars’ convent (AFH v, 362-3). Some put the date as 1264 and say that the house was affiliated to Seusslitz (S. Chiara 438). In 1465 some sisters were sent from Nuremberg to carry out reforms (AF ii, 417-8).”Abbesses: “c. 1270: Adelheit von Lobhaus (Wauer, Entstehung 141n); 1469: Felicity Trautmann (AF ii, 418, 477); 1469 Margaret Grunther (Priorissa) AFii, 418, 477)”

And who was it made for?
It says in the plate description… ” …for chapel of the castle of Cheb” (again, it was Eger)Cheb’s page shows them too. Here’s the castle and here’s the castle’s chapel interior (and A detail picture). Here’s a modern Map of Cheb , you an see the castle (#4) up in the the northern bend of the river.
#8 is the convent.
#3 is where the piece lives now, the Musem of Cheb.

The Beads: Where did they come from?

Cheb is located less than 40 Kilometers from the small bavarian town of Bischofsgrun, Germany, which is just a few miles on the other side of the modern Czech/German Border.Bischofsgrun is important in many ways. It is one of the first glassmaking capitols in that part of Europe. A “glass hut” (translation from web) was found dating from 900. “Bischofesgrune” was first mentioned in 1242. The tradition of glass-making was first mentioned in 1340 (*1). by 1536 they had 39 glass houses (*2). Duke Albrecht V requested the court cartographer to a map of Bavaria in 1554-1561. In it he included the desctiption as: “Here there are many Glassworks, (producing) blown glass, exceptional mirror glass, and glass beads.” (*3). Modernly Bischofsgrun is famed for it’s history as a medieval stained glass center, and is part of many “glass tours” for those who study glass history. I think it’s a good possibility the beads may have come from Bischofsgrun, or even perhaps there was an even closer factory. Glass makers were considered a reputable and desirable industry.

(*1).source: Bischofsgrun, Germany glass tour website
(*2) source: Bischofsgrun, Germany website
(*3) source: Sibyll Jorgstaff, Glass Beads Of EuropeNEW Text about Cheb History: Following text from this page on Cheb:

The history of Cheb, one of Bohemia’s oldest towns, dates from the 9th century. The remains of a Slavonic settlement have been found on the site of todays castle, in its strategic location above the Ohre river. The first reference to Cheb was in a document by Germany king Heinrich IV., in 1061. The town was then called Egre, derived from “Agara”, the Celtic name of the river running through it and taken into German as “Eger”. The Czech name goes back at least to 1322. During the 12th century, Cheb came under the administration of the margraves of Vohburg and German colonization followed. In 1149, Cheb came under the House of Hohenstauf. Friedrich Barbarossa, the emperor and the most significant member of the family, made Cheb a stronghold of his power politics aimed against the Principality of Bohemia. Czech rulers, however, also proved interested in the regions strategic location. Using the claim to inheritance as a pretext, Premysl Otakar II invaded the once Slavonic territory in 1266 and temporarily annexed it to Bohemia. Until 1305 the region was administered by Vaclav II, Otakars son, who gained control over it as part of the dowry of his wife Guta, a daughter of the Emperor Rudolph of Hapsburg. Although the town was repeatedly taken by the German Empire after Vaclavs death, the inhabitants of Cheb maintained good relations with Bohemia and, after the Premyslid dynasty, became growingly concerned about stability. The permanent annexation of Cheb to the Bohemian Crown Lands came in 1322. John of Luxembourg, the Czech king, acquired the region from Ludwig the Bavarian as a hereditary pledge in recognition of service in the fight for the Emperors throne.

In the 14th century, Cheb was one of the leading towns in the kingdom, being the fourth biggest in Bohemia with a population of 7300. It received many privileges: the Golden Bull made Cheb inhabitants free of duties and tolls throughout the Empire, they had a provincial parliament, a provincial high court, and the minting right (1235). An important trade route, the Via Regia, led through town. During the Hussite wars, the town sided with Catholics and was the point of departure for the 1421 and 1427 crusades. History records the diplomatic negotiations of the Basel Ecclesiastic Council and the Hussites over the conditions of the latters attendance. Chebs faith in Jiri of Podebrady, the “Hussite” king, was confirmed not only by this many visits but also by his childrens weddings taking place in the town.

During the Thirty Years War, Cheb suffered attacks by Swedish, Saxon and imperial troops. The town went down in European history on the bloodstained date of 25 February 1634, when Albrecht of Wallenstein, the Emperors high commander, died at the hands of the Irish captain Deveroux.

Because of the war and the general decline of towns, the economy became stagnant. By a 1652 decree issued by Ferdinand III, Cheb was converted into a military fortress. When completed in 1740, however, the mighty Baroque structure was outdated and challenge to French troops laying siege two years later. An imperial contract brought leading Baroque architects to Cheb: K.Dienzenhofer, P.Bayer, G.Alliprandi, A.Pfeffer and others. Thanks to them the town boasts some marvelous buildings, e.g. St Clares Church, the Dominican monastery, the town hall, etc. The towns appearance was dramatically changed by the early 19th century. The fortifications were pulled down and a large part of the original Gothic town wall together with the gates was demolished. And still another event, deprived Cheb of its medieval features: the great fire of 1809. It destroyed more than 100 houses. Chebs oldest church, St John the Baptist, included.

Industrial development brought revival, in both economy and culture. In 1938, came the Munich agreement, followed by World War II. The ultimate displacement of German residents, eventually depopulated Chebs historical center, accelerating a catastrophic decay of monuments. Only resolute refurbishment put an end to such dilapidation (1956-1969). Since 1989 Cheb has become a notable culture and bussines center. International activities, like Euroregio Egrensis, have restored the tradition, and the unique character of the region.

13th Century: Halberstadt Antependium

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Some pics below from: http://fraubevin.blogspot.com

13th Century: Halberstadt Antependium

 german12thAltar frontal of the high altar of Halberstadt Cathedral

Lower Saxony, second half of the 13th century, Halberstadt, Cathedral Museum, No. 203
Throne: about 58 cm high

Detail. Red satin faded to old rose. Bead embroidery on parchment and linen. Coral and glass beads of cylindrical and spherical form, opaque and transparent. Predominant colors: coral red, two shades of green, dark blue shading, to light blue, turquoise, aubergine (i.e. eggplant purple), gold, black.

All the seed pearls and most of the violet glass beads and the gilded plaques are now missing. The outer edge and inner fields of the throne had metal plaques with Romanesque foliage and palmettes (their imprints remain on the material). The effect of the whole is impaired by the white patches left where the seed pearls and gold plaques have disappeared.

Pictoral History of Embroidery, M. Schuette (Library of Congress # 64-13379) [Gestickte Bildteppiche des Mittelalters (in english: Art of Medieval Tapestry), Leipzig1930.] Frederick A. Praeger, Inc, Publisher, New York 1964, 64 University Place, New York 3, New York

17th Century: Drawstring Bag, 1610-1650

Drawstring bag

English, 1610–50

Item info from: https://collections.mfa.org/objects/119711

DESCRIPTION: Red silk satin embroidered with gold metallic threads, seed pearls, metal purl, spangles, and bits of colored glass. Baroque design. Embroidery stitches include laid and couching, beading, bullion knots, braid stitch. Green and metallic braided cords and strap at top; two wood-core drawstring pull tassels covered in seed pearls, with silk, metallic thread and spangles. Green silk lining.
PROVENANCEEx-Seligman Coll. (London); Elizabeth Day McCormick collection; Gift to the MFA, October 14, 1943
DIMENSIONS: Overall (without tassels and cord): 6 x 6 cm (2 3/8 x 2 3/8 in.)
CREDIT LINE: The Elizabeth Day McCormick Collection
ACCESSION NUMBER: 4:3.1080
CLASSIFICATIONS: Costumes

17th Century: Portrait of a young woman from a Gdańsk patrician family, around 1625-35

Portrait of a young woman from a Gdańsk patrician family, around 1625-35.
Artist unknown.
From the collection of Museu Sa Bassa Blanc.

17th Century: Spangled ruff in Portraits of Doña Ana de Velasco y Girón

She must have loved this amazing ruff with dangling silver pointed spangles, this looks like the same one and same person over a few decades! Must have ben her signature item.

 

17th Century: Portrait of Krystyna Lubomirska, after 1603

(Polish) National Musuem in Warsaw

More:

 

 

17th Century: Portrait of a lady with an elaborate jewelled headdress

Spanish School, 17th Century
Portrait of a lady with an elaborate jewelled headdress
oil on canvas
28 x 22 in. (71.1 x 55.9 cm.)

17th Century: Hungarian wedding dress

WOMAN’S CORSET-BODICE AND SKIRT
Mid-17th Century
MAGYAR NEMZETI MÚZEUM
(Hungarian National Museum)
Budapest, Hungary

Earlier researches attributed the costume to Pál Esterházy’s (1635–1713) first wife Orsolya Esterházy (1641–1682) and later to his second wife Éva Thököly (1659–1716). The original owner can no longer be traced but the cut and the embroidery ascertain that either could have worn it at her wedding. Contrary to Western European customs, in Hungary later generations gladly donned the ornate costumes of their forebears on some festive occasion. The suite was restored by Mrs Sándor Borsi between 1969 and 1971.

The skirt and the attached bodice constitute an outstanding ensemble of old Hungarian costume, a harmonious alloy of the exotic oriental traditions of earlier centuries and elements of the fast-changing Western European fashions.

(Note from Jen: I’m going to guess the red beads are Coral, I have many such examples of coral beads from Germany in earlier centuries. I’m trying to find more on this.)

16th Century: Ventian purse


Translation via Google Translate:

Purse

Venice, end of the 16th century.
13x8x6 cm.

Cut velvet dark green silk embroidered in silver-gilt and silver yarn and curly, pearls, the application technique, the technique of blue silk satin stitch, silver sequins. Suspension and borders in gilt silver cord twisted yarn. Pink taffeta lining. The bag, unusual shape, could fulfill most uses: purses, comosuggests chuisa front pocket with a cord, door dust orportaprofumi. Wisely suspended the waist of the dress, very much in vogue, the ‘bag-shaped lute “and very valuable both for the quality of the embroidery and the richness of the materials for setting stistica.The plant motifs that adorn every part of the accessory are made with grace and richness of details highlighted by the many pearls placed in various parts in order to highlight the preziosita. This refined accessory, which certainly emphasized the sumptuousness of a ceremonial dress, it was probably a gift love, how can suggest two hearts pierced by two arrows, according to a custom widespread in the Renaissance.

The original description, in Italian:

BORSA

Venezia, fine del XVI secolo.
Cm. 13x8x6

Velluto tagliato di seta verde scuro ricamato in argento dorato e argento filato e riccio, perle, nella tecnica di applicazione; seta azzurra nella tecnica del punto raso; pailettes d’argento. Sospensione e bordure in cordoncino intrecciato d’argento dorato filato. Fodera in taffetas rosa acceso. La borsa, forma insolita, poteva assolvere a piu usi: portamonete, como suggerisce la tasca anteriore chuisa da un cordoncino, porta polveri o portaprofumi. Sapientemente sospesa alla cintura dell’abito, come imponeva la moda, la “borsetta a forma di liuto” e alquanto preziosa sia per la qualita del ricamo e la richezza dei materiali che per l’impostazione stistica. I motivi fitomorfi che ornano ogni parte dell’accessorio sono stati realizzati con grazia e ricchezza di particolari evidenziati dalle numerose perle collocate in varie parti per sottolinearne la preziosita.Questo raffinatissimo accessorio, che certo ribadiva la sontuosita di un abito cerimoniale, probabilmente era un dono d’amore, come possono suggerire i due cuori trafitti da due frecce, secondo un’usanza molto diffusa nell’epoca rinascimentale.

© I Mestieri della moda a Venezia dal XIII al XVIII Secolo. Ala Napoleonica E Museo Correr, Venice. 1988.

 

17th Century: purple velvet pouch

Purse of purple velvet, consisting of four pattes on which alternately the crowned monogram ‘DG’ or ‘ML’ or two entwined hands under a burning heart, embroidered with multicolored silk, gold thread, pearls, spangles and rubies, anonymous, c. 1600 – c. 1625

17th Century: Game Bag

Embroidered game bag: silk, silver, and gold on velvet (Dresden 1609)

17th Century: 1625-1650 Beaded bag

Small flat bag of coloured beads netted on a foundation of thick linen thread, and patterned with bird and flowers and inscribed ‘IN HOP ME HART DOTH REST’. With brown, green, white, yellow and blue beads. Lined with chamois leather. Above the beadwork is a band of material of green silk covered with a pale pink silk.

Link to item @ V&A

There is also a pink satin lining and pink ribbon handles. The pink silk and satin are probably later additions.

‘IN HOP ME HART DOTH REST’ (Inscribed in beadwork above the birds and flowers)

  • Width: 13cm
  • Length: 11.5cm
  • Width: 5.125in
  • Length: 4.5in

 

17th Century: 1662 Mirror

Looking glass or mirror, seven inches wide, in a wide frame with beadwork decoration arranged in two full-height verticals and two short horizontal panels

top and bottom. Yellow cord runs between the vertical and horizontal panels.

Design

In each corner a medallion containing a figure of a woman, one of them being Diana with a bow and dog, the others represented with a horse, an alligator, and a cock. In the upper rectangle are three seated women (possibly the three Fates spinning) with a naked recumbent man below. To the left is Venus with Cupid and a peacock and, above, her chariot drawn by a pair of doves. To the right is a clothed woman, possibly Charity, with three naked children. Below is a composition of flowers, birds and beasts. Along the upper edge the inscription: ‘IM6 6W2’. The sight and back edges of the frame are lined with tooled brown leather, worked in a geometric pattern.

2018 – in a modern glazed case

  • Height: 71.1cm
  • Width: 66cm (Note: Thickness of frame estimated at 4cm.)

H 2′ 4″ W 2′ 2″ 2018 In a modern glazed case 75 x 70 x 6.5cm
Link to V&A page

17th Century: 1659 Basket

Examples of beadwork that can be associated with makers whose names and dates are known suggest that they were usually made by teenage girls from affluent families. Their function is uncertain. They may have been used as layette baskets, which held baby clothes, because they are similar in form to silver examples. But it has also been suggested that they were made to celebrate betrothals or used at wedding ceremonies to hold gloves, sprigs of rosemary or other favours given to guests. Most examples depict a couple as the central motif. All of the design elements may be found in silk embroidery on domestic furnishings of the period.
Link to item @ V&A

Materials & Making
The basket is made from glass beads strung on linen thread and fine wire, supported on a wire frame lined with silk. Beadwork keeps true, clear colours, an advantage over coloured silks and wools, the usual materials for embroidery. A beaded cushion in the V&A dated 1657 bears the inscription ‘natvrs flowers soon doe fade ful long we last cavse art vs made’.

Ownership & Use
Another beaded basket of identical design exists, with only the name and date different. This suggests that it may have been worked from a type of kit, or possibly made to commission as a gift, with the recipient’s name added.

1659, English; Signed Sarah Gurnall
set with the maker or recipient’s name : sarah gvrnall avgvst 24 anno 1659

  • Height: 11cm
  • Width: 46.5cm
  • Depth: 36cm

17th Century: 1628 Beaded Bag

A number of beaded bags from the early 17th century survive. Their stylized floral patterns and less expensive materials imitate the elaborate embroidered versions carried by the aristocracy. Many bear mottos or expressions relating to charity, friendship or luck, which suggests that they may have been used for gifts of money.
Link to page @ V&A

Materials & Making
The development of the ‘drawn-glass’ technique about 1490 allowed the manufacture of large numbers of small, round, coloured beads with a central hole, of the type used in this purse. The glassworks on the island of Murano near Venice were the most famous during the Renaissance, but by the early 17th century the technology had spread to glass-making centres in Amsterdam and Bavaria. Beads were produced mainly for trade with North America and Africa, but they were also sold in Europe for use in embroidery.

Subjects Depicted
The expression ‘hit or miss’ is first recorded in the English language in William Shakespeare’s play Troilus and Cressida published in 1606, where it has the same meaning of random luck that it has today. The expression may have derived from a country dance also known as ‘hit and miss’, recorded as early as 1626.

Purse of brown glass beads on a ground of netted silk. With a diamond diaper pattern in blue and white beads with clusters of green and blue beads at the intersections. In each diamond a letter ‘S’ in dark blue beads is surrounded by white and yellow beads. Lined with leather and buff silk. Two tassels of buff silk ribbon at the bottom.

  • Height: 8.9cm
  • Width: 12.7cm
  • Depth: 1cm

17th Century: Beaded Casket

Casket

English ca. 1650-1660 (made)

Wooden casket decorated with panels of glass beads sewn onto a canvas ground. On the lid is a figure of Justice depicted with her attributes of sword and scales. On the sides are cupid and a seated lady, on the back a mermaid and swan. The casket has metal handles at the sides and a key in the centre front. There is a shallow drawer at the bottom of the front side. No other internal fittings remain.
  • Width: 270mm
  • Height: 155mm
  • Depth: 290mm

Link to Object @ the V&A

REUNION: THE BEA’D GEES

The V&A owns these three pieces. Not much has been known other than they were German and late 13th Century. All three are solid glass seed beadwork on parchment with ink underdrawings, but that is there the simlairity ends. The pointed piece on the right which is presumed to be part of an Orphrey, featuring he Virgin Mary.

The squares and the Orphrey remnant are NOT related despite sometimes being shown together. I have never believed the right piece, the pointed longer one, belongs with the squares, and as it turned out from looking at copies of the file sheets on each it was stated they were acquired a year apart. Having seen them mere inches away in the flesh I can say my long suspicions I that I think they are from the same area in Germany around the same time, but are not done by the same person and not for the same piece. The styles are too divergent (the heads face opposite directions, for just a start). As a result, I have put the long piece on it’s own page where I discuss it since I have seen it in person.

To see detailed closeup photos taken during my 2002 visit to the V&A of these pieces, click here (members only)

Back to the saints squares:

When searching in Halberstadt’s museum listing at Bildindex I discovered many new pieces of beadwork I hadn’t seen before, one of them was a familiar looking textile fragment likely from a edging for an altar or wall hanging also called an “antipendium”. Almost immediately I knew what I was seeing. It features a band of silk the bottom has tassels capped with beaded roundels and in the center one very lonely, yet familiar looking saint beaded on a square parchment. As thin the V&A piece and many others) the face of the saint was picked bare of it’s pearls, but it’s obvious that there were round shapes that had been removed (the attachment stitches at still intact). After seeing this kind of thing in many other beaded pieces I’m sure that there were large round stamped gold foil decorative pictorial Brakteat (bezants) of nearly 5″ in size that were snipped at the punched holes in the metal and removed from the intact threads.

  This photo is from a book from the 1920’s pre color photography, it’s been colored at the press, so it’s not exaclty correct. But from the colors represented you can tell the beads are the same as the V&A pieces. Cobalt blue, turquise, coral, and gold.. Pearls and “plättchen” have been looted just as the V&A squares. The rows of beads match as well. AS you will see below.

I am attempting to judge size to verify these are in fact from the same item. I thought since they are so simliar, I’d show my work on this problem. All pieces were reduced and rotated to fit with in set dimensions using guide lines. So getting the pics to all be roughly the same size was key place to start to see if the are actually the same size in real life. Someone is gonna ask me to prove it, so here. Enjoy.

THEORY: If the number of beaded rows to fill two identical shaped areas is (roughtly) the same, they should be in theory be the same size. If it was a bigger piece reduced down to match a smaller piece in dimensional size the largerwould have more visiable rows of beads than the smaller piece becasue in reality while the beads are the same size there is more area to fill and would require more beads I more rows to complete it. Make sense? I also figured since they have started to look familiar now I have have named them after three brothers whom they resemble to make referring to them easier. Ladies and Gents, I present…

THE BEAD GEES

The easiest way to show the rows of bead was to take the clearest one, (Barry here) and draw over the lines of his rows. I did it in red as you can see. Instead of redrawing the lines of Robin’s beads and going blind, I overlayed Barry’s bead outline on Robin and Maurice’s rows, which I think proves the case better than anything else could.

Barry (V&A) Robin (Germany) Maurice (V&A)
Barry one is simliar to Robin over in Germany in many ways so this is the one I used to establish they are from the same hand. The way the blue background was treated, the neckline of the tunic. The number of rows around the halo and the way the corners have been filled (I’d called it mitered if it were woodwork) and the beads themselves are our keys here judging Robin’s size using Barry as our guide. Robin has as you can see has an almost identical design as Barry sans the sexy beard and famous ‘Something About Mary’ Hair-Do. His corners aren’t filled with any shapes as Maurice’s are, but his halo is the same as Maurice. While Robin is not a great shot there are clear highlights to match lines up with. Since Maurice lives with Barry in London, and I’ve visited them both in person and can vouch (as the picture above can) that they are the same size and “match” in all the right ways, as it were. He’s mainly here to fill out my theme and look pretty. Besides, when I was in my Bee Gees phase growing up I never liked Maurice. So there.
The pictures demonstrate the similarities using all three saints. Key: B=Barry R=Robin M=Maurice While not exact (it’s impossible to match exactly with beadwork) it’s clear looking at the composite pictures that they are the same size, but are designed and sewn by the same hands. Each beadworker works their beads differently, so to see multiple similarities in the pieces in different locations is encouraging. The angle of the faces, the colors, the three rows of gold beads on the border, the neckline, the cape, the two tone striping of the hair.the design of the eye, the rosy dots on the cheeks. These guys are truly brothers.
This is a great example of the Robin (R) and Barry (B) pieces. (The Barry picture is one I took during my V&A visit, thus the angle.) What this shows is that the beads are the same size and the scale of the pieces is the same, it also shows the same working style. The way the corners are worked is, for me, the clincher. As I said every beadworker works differntly, and to see such a dead match for the number of rows in the blue and the way the rows are filled, the way the gold lines and the halos match up, – well tats all the is all the proof I personally need. Everything meshes. I am 100% postive that Barry and Maurice at the V&A were originally on the textile fragment at the Halberstadr Dom Museum with Robin. Perhaps that’s one Beegees reunion that can happen someday.

This is my digitally recontructed example of what this edging might have looked like complete with the two squares from the V&A in London.

COMPUTER RECREATION OF ALL KNOWN PIECES AS COMPLETE HANGING

COMPUTER RECREATION OF ALL KNOWN PIECES AS COMPLETE HANGING

16th C Pearled Panels

(The last three pics seem to be from a third panel i can so far not find a whole pic of)

From: https://archive.org/details/geschichtederli03bock/page/89/mode/1up?view=theater

Bild 37.
Albenparura. Prag, Domschatz.(Aus Podlaha u. Sittler, Der Domschatz zu Prag) ist bloß eine mit einem solchen ausgestattet, die aus der Neustädter St Johannes-Kirche zu Hannover stammende, mit M. XX 6 bezeichnete Albe im Pro-vinzialmuseum daselbst. Die Bordüre setzt sich aus Vierpässen zusammen,Welche mit einem Wappenschild gefüllt sind und durch Blattwerk voneinandergeschieden werden. Bemerkenswert ist, daß aber auch hier in der Mitte desSaumes die Paruren nicht fehlen. In der Neuzeit ging es den Albenparuren ähnlich wie dem Besatz desAmiktes. Während indessen bei letzterem die Verzierung ganz aufhörte, be-

Bild 38.
AlbeDparura. Prag, Domschatz.(Aus Podlaha u. Sittler, Der Domschatz zu Prag.) 90 Erster Abschnitt. Die liturgischen Untergewänder. gann bei der Albe eine rückläufige Bewegung, indem wieder Vollbordürenan Stelle der Paruren traten. Ein gutes Beispiel einer solchen Albe, eine Schöpfung des 16. Jahr-hunderts, findet sich in der ehemaligen Stiftskirche zu Goß in Steiermark.Der breite Besatz, der sich um den ganzen Eand derselben hinzieht, ist teilsin mehrfarbiger Seide teils in Goldstickerei ausgeführt1. Im allgemeinen hielt das Außermodekommen der Alben- und Amiktparuragleichen Schritt, wie sie ja auch so ziemlich zur gleichen Zeit aufgetretenwaren und in gleichem Maß sich verbreitet hatten. Freilich auch nur imallgemeinen. Denn wie wir noch gegen Ende des 16. Jahrhunderts dort Amikt-besätze antreffen, wo die Zierstücke der Alben, wie es scheint, schon außerGebrauch gekommen waren, so begegnen uns umgekehrt diese hie und danoch, nachdem jene bereits eine Weile von de

 

Outside link: Veil and Edge Beading

I used to have a PDF for a class on some basic veil edging work and a little research. It was corrupted over the years and  recently was asked to try to find it and was unable to.

But I did find THIS. And it’s far superior to what I had, and why re-invent the wheel when I can spread the love. So it’s linked below!

Point any Questions about it to the author, Dona Yasmina who has contact info on the last page of the document.

Practically Period and Perfectly Practical Prettification: Basic Steps in Beaded Edging
by Dona Alessandra Bentivegna da Faenza, called Yasmina, Barony of Thescorre

16th Century: Portrait of Hedwig Jagiello

Hedwig Jagiello (1513-1573)

Hedwig Jagiello was born on March 15., 1513 in poznań and died on February 7., 1573 She was a polish princess from 1535 to 1535 until 1535

Hedwig was the daughter of the king of Poland. From Poland from his marriage to Barbara references, daughter of hungarian pala and magnet Stephan references.

She married on 1. September 1535 in krakow on 1. September 1535 in Krakow. Four children were born four children:

• Elisabeth (born). 1537; gesture. He married Duke Franz Otto, married to Duke Franz Otto of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Born 1595). 1530; gesture. 1559
• Sigismund (born). 1538; gesture. 1566), Prince of Brandenburg, Archbishop of magdeburg and bishop of Berlin
• Hedwig (born). 1540; gesture. 1602), princess of Brandenburg, married to Duke Julius of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel
• Sophia (born). 1541; gesture. 1564), princess of Brandenburg, married to Wilhelm Von Rosenberg

The Strictly Catholic Princess held on her faith, even when her husband turned to Lutheran teaching and began the reformation in Brandenburg. Joachim had released his wife to accept the new marriage or to remain faithful to the old man.

She accompanied her husband in 1541 to regensburg in 1541 When Joachim accepted Luther’s teaching, she remained with her catholic faith in her Catholic Faith, which gave her the spouse after interventions from Krakow.

After the death of Joachim II. In 1571 she lived at the castle of ruppin castle in old ruppin. She died there at the age of 59 on February 7., 1573.

.
Source:
Www. Gene. Org
Www. Berlin-the capital. They
Www. DB-Thueringen. They
(Digital Library Thuringia)
Www Yes Wow! PL
(German Historical Institute Warsaw)
Www. Universes-Mercatores-of-Hansa-Theutonicorum. From
(Universitatis Jagellonica Cracoviensis acta scientiarum)

Literature:
– Johann Dorner: Duchess Hedwig and her court state: everyday life at the castle castle according to original sources of the 15. th century, volume 53 of Burgundy’s history leaves
– Juliane Jacobi: Pre-Modern Education: Self-and foreign descriptions in the early modern period (contributions to historical education research, volume 41), page 216, ISBN 10: 9783412204921 AND ISBN 13: 978-3412204921

Image: Hedwig Princess of brandenburg at 1535, portrayed by Hans Krell (1490-1565)

16th Century: Bostocke Sampler

 

 

All photos Copyright: © Victoria and Albert Museum, London 2017. All Rights Reserved

From the V&A page:

Linen sampler embroidered with silk and metal thread with pearls and beads.In the area above the inscription are the following motifs: an owl in a tree, a dog with collar and lead, a lion passant guardant, a chained and muzzled bear in a field of daisies, a tree with a squirrel and a pelican in her piety, a crouching hind, a spray of cowslips and a small dog with ‘IVNO’ above it. There are also three small motifs that have been unpicked, which appear to be a castle on an elephant, a squirrel cracking a nut, and a raven. All of these motifs are worked in cross stitch except for the large dog which is filled in with closely worked arrowhead stitch. There are also two tiny examples of metal thread interlacing in the top right corner. The rest of the sampler is filled with formal geometrical and floral repeating patterns. These are worked mainly in back stitch, but there are examples of work in more complicated stitches showing that the back stitch was intended to be a grounding for further elaboration. Other stitches include satin, chain, ladder, buttonhole and detached buttonhole filling, couching in patterns, coral, speckling, two-side Italian cross, bullion and French knots and beadwork. The colours are brown, greens, red, pink, blue, white and yellow.
Place of Origin England (made)

Date: 1598 (made)
Artist/maker: Bostocke, Jane (maker)
Materials and Techniques” Embroidered linen with coloured silk and metal threads, seed pearls and beads

Marks and inscriptions” ‘JANE BOSTOCKE 1598 / ALICE LEE WAS BORNE THE 23 OF NOVEMBER BE / ING TWESDAY IN THE AFTER NOONE 1596’
The lettering of the inscription is worked in back stitch with Algerian eye stitch punctuation except for the letters ‘BOSTOC’ which are worked in seed pearls over a back stitch foundation.

Dimensions Length: 42.6 cm, Width: 36.2 cm

Object history note: According to research published by Martyn Freeth (see bibliography), Alice Lee and Jane Bostocke were first cousins, both grandchildren of Thomas Lee (1500-62) of Langley and Jane Corbet of Moreton Corbet in Shropshire. The 3 motifs which have been unpicked are crests or badges from Jane’s side of the family, while those still in place are from Alice’s.

Descriptive line: Sampler of embroidered linen with coloured silk and metal threads, seed pearls and beads, made by Jane Bostocke, England, dated 1598.

Bibliographic References:
(Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no) Browne, Clare and Jennifer Wearden, eds. Samplers from the Victoria and Albert Museum. London : V&A Publications, 1999. 144 p., ill. ISBN 1851773096.
Clabburn, Pamela. Samplers. Princes Risborough : Shire Publications, 1998. ISBN 07478 0365 X, pp.7-9
Roach, Audrey. Secrets of the Sampler. Country Life, 1 May 2003
Tarrant, Naomi, ‘The Jane Bostocke Sampler’ in Shropshire Family History Society Journal vol.29 part 4, p.151
Freeth, Martyn, ‘The Bostocke Sampler – A postcript’ in Shropshire Family History Society Journal March 2009
King, Donald, The Earliest Dated Sampler (1598) : Jane Bostocke’s gift to Alice Lee, Connoisseur, CXLIX, 234 (1962)

Materials Linen; Silk; Metal thread; Pearls; Beads

Techniques Weaving; Embroidery

16th Century: Portraits of sisters, and family.

Family Portrait of Armgard and Walburgis, Countesses of Rietberg and parents, Count John II of Rietberg and Agnes of Bentheim-Steinfurt in Rietberg. Piece was mutilated in 19th-century and reassembled from 3 pieces.Detail: Armgard and Walburgis, Countesses of Rietberg
Portraits by Tom Ring

 

16th Century: Portraits of Susanna of Bavaria

Artist: Peter Gertner (attr.) – Unknown

Susanna of Bavaria (2 April 1502 – 23 April 1543)
Susannah of Bavaria on Wikipedia

Suzanna of Bavaria, Margravine of Brandebourg-Culmbach by Barthel Beham

16th Century: Portraits of Sophie of Mecklenburg

Sophie of Mecklenburg-Güstrow (4 September 1557 – 14 October 1631)

16th Century: Portrait 1511

Portrait of the Margrave Casimir of Brandenburg
1511, lime panel, Pinakothek at Munich

16th Century: Portraits of Anne of Denmark

Anne of Denmark (12 December 1574 – 2 March 1619), Queen consort of Scotland, England and Ireland

16th Century: Portraits of Barbara Radziwill

Barbora Radvilaitė; 6 December 1520/23 – 8 May 1551) was Queen of Poland and Grand Duchess of Lithuania

More Portraits of  Barbara Radziwill

This is a unique case, being her clothing is so unique and she appears to have many different pieces of this cowl as well as other beadwork so I decided to lump her all into one page.

16th Century: Portrait of Anne of Cleves

Anne of Cleves by Holbein, c.1539.

16th Century: Portrait

Portrait of Felicitas von Wallbrunn, 1539 : Mittelrhein-Museum, Koblenz. Germany  by Hans Abel the Younger (1506-1567)

16th Century: Portrait Wilhelm IV of Bavaria and his wife Jacoba of Baden, 1525

Duke Wilhelm IV of Bavaria and his wife Jacoba of Baden (1526) by Hans Schwab von Wertinger

Museum Veste Coburg

16th Century: Portrait 1545

Conrad Faber Portrait of Anne von Glauburg1545

16th Century: Portrait 1518

 1518 Lucas Cranach (Northern Renaissance Painter, 1472-1553) and his workshop Anna Buchner

16th Century: Portrait 1513

Lucas Cranach (Northern Renaissance Painter, 1472-1553)  and his workshop  Portrait of a Woman 1513

16th Century: Portrait

Lucas Cranach (Northern Renaissance Painter, 1472-1553) and his workshop Princess Maria of Saxony

16th Century: Portrait

Lucas Cranach (Northern Renaissance Painter, 1472-1553) and his workshop Portrait of a Young Lady Holding Grapes

16th Century: Portrait of Saxon Princesses

Lucas Cranach (Northern Renaissance Painter, 1472-1553) and his workshop Portrait of a Young Woman 1530

16th Century: Portrait 1530

Lucas Cranach (Northern Renaissance Painter, 1472-1553) and his workshop Portrait of a Young Woman 1530

16th Century: Portrait 1528

Lucas Cranach (Northern Renaissance Painter, 1472-1553) and his workshop Portrait of a Woman 1528

 

16th Century: Portrait 1541

LUCAS CRANACH (1472 – 1553) | A Lady in a green velvet and orange dress and a pearl-embroidered black hat – 1541.

16th Century: Beaded Bag

Beaded leather bag, 1630s, British; inscribed ‘heare et is hit or miss’, acorn pattern

 

A number of beaded bags from the early 17th century survive. Their stylized floral patterns and less expensive materials imitate the elaborate embroidered versions carried by the aristocracy. Many bear mottos or expressions relating to charity, friendship or luck, which suggests that they may have been used for gifts of money. This example is inscribed ‘heare et is hit or miss’.

The development of the ‘drawn-glass’ technique about 1490 allowed the manufacture of large numbers of small, round, coloured beads with a central hole, of the type used in this purse. The glassworks on the island of Murano near Venice were the most famous during the Renaissance, but by the early 17th century the technology had spread to glass-making centres in Amsterdam and Bavaria. Beads were produced mainly for trade with North America and Africa, but they were also sold in Europe for use in embroidery.

The expression ‘hit or miss’ is first recorded in the English language in William Shakespeare’s play Troilus and Cressida published in 1606, where it has the same meaning of random luck that it has today. The expression may have derived from a country dance also known as ‘hit and miss’, recorded as early as 1626.

Text from: https://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O74982/purse-unknown/http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O158778/bag-unknown/

Physical description: A flat, square leather bag, covered with red, white, green, yellow and blue glass beads in a repeating pattern of stylized acorns. It has silver thread loops, silk tassels and holes in the leather for a drawstring

Place of Origin: Great Britain (made)

Date: 1630-1639 (made)

Materials and Techniques: Kidskin, glass beads, linen thread, silk thread, silver thread; hand sewn, hand beaded

Dimensions: Length: 13.0 cm approx., bag only, Width: 14.6 cm approx., bag only

Beaded leather bag, 1630s, British; inscribed ‘heare et is hit or miss’, acorn pattern

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no): John Lea Nevinson, Catalogue of English Domestic Embroidery of the Sixteenth & Seventeenth Centuries, Victoria and Albert Museum, Department of Textiles, London: HMSO, 1938, p.100

Materials: Kidskin; Glass beads; Linen thread; Silk thread; Silver thread

16th Century: Beaded Portrait

AN EXTREMELY FINE AND RARE ENGLISH PORTRAIT IN NEEDLEWORK DEPICTING QUEEN ELIZABETH I
CIRCA 1580
MEASUREMENTS: 6 3/4 by 6 1/2 in.; the panel 4 3/4 by 4 1/2 in.

DESCRIPTION
Delicately worked in polychrome silks, silver and gold metal threads ornamented with seed pearls and glass beads, the face painted on vellum, Gloriana shown standing on a terrace wearing a feather plumed hat worked with seed pearls, with a ruff above a couched bodice with similar ballooned sleeves, the dress diapered with silver thread and sequins and flossed polychrome silk bands, and with a yellow lined short cape, with cut painted paper hands, one holding a plumed fan, the other gloves(?), the sky worked in silver thread and centered by a shining star above a vista of rolling hills and woods with a town in the upper right, to the left a knotted garden centered by an elaborate fountain surmounted by Eros holding a bow, to the right a small landscape with buildings and enclosed fields with a scene of dogs chasing a stag, partly enclosed by a bower of red roses, white lilies and yellow dog roses, with a pair of birds and a robin, the foreground with balustrades before a paved terrace, one end with square pot with a climbing white flowers, perhaps eglinton, the foreground with a further balustrade ornamented with roundels enclosing fleurs de lys; the panel within a gold metal thread square tape with silver thread square jewels and with fleur de lys corners, and with an outer blue tape threaded with a gold thread and a red silk snake ornamented with seed pearls, joined at the top, and interspersed with woven green silk leaves.

This was sold at Sotheby’s in April of 2004 for $153,600.

16th Century: Russian Mitre

Mitre | Russia; Moscow | 1595

Damask cloth, silver, satin, gold threads, silk threads, pearls | The Kremlin State Historical & Cultural Museums

Belonged to Patriarch Job (1585-1605)